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Eclipse, 31st May, 05:08 BST Eclipse, 31st May, 05:09 BST Eclipse, 31st May, 05:16 BST Eclipse, 31st May, 05:23 BST Eclipse, 31st May, 05:36 BST Eclipse, 31st May 2003 Eclipse, 31st May 2003 Eclipse, 31st May 2003 Eclipse, 31st May 2003 Eclipse, 31st May 2003 Eclipse, 31st May 2003 Eclipse, 31st May 2003 Transit of Mercury, 7th May 2003 Transit of Mercury, 7th May 2003 Transit of Mercury, 7th May 2003 Full Moon, 16th April 2003 Crescent Moon, 4th April 2003 Crescent Moon, 5th April 2003 Crescent Moon, 2nd August 2003 Moon, 6th September 2003 Moon, 9th August 2003 Full Moon, sometime in 1996


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INTRODUCTION
Several members of the Society are keen astrophotographers, this page is dedicated to images of astronomical subjects as photographed by Society Members. As time permits (and other photographs come to light) more images and Gallery pages are likely to be added.

So, if you are a Society member and have some photo's worth adding to this record, you know what to do! All I need is the photo (preferably in digital format, JPEG), a brief description, time taken, and the equipment used - I'll do the rest.

The photographs within this page are the property of the respective photographers. Reproduction or use of any of the photographs on this page without the prior permisssion of the Webmaster is forbidden.

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PARTIAL SOLAR ECLIPSE OF 31ST MAY 2003
(Visible as an annular solar eclipse further north.)

Eclipse, 31st May, 05:09 BST

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In this photo the Sun has almost fully risen, the time is now 05:09 BST. The lower limb of the Sun appears jagged owing to objects on the horizon but it is now evident that part of it is missing! (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, 2x teleconverter.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Eclipse, 31st May, 05:16 BST

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The Sun has now fully risen, the time is now 05:16 BST. Apart from a chunk of the Sun missing I thought this photo is striking because of the beautiful red colouration and banding visible on the solar disk, an atmospheric effect.

It is worth comparing this photo with the one below since it shows how much the Moon has moved in just a few minutes. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, 2x teleconverter.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Eclipse, 31st May, 05:23 BST

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The time is now 05:23 BST. A portion of the Sun is still missing but with the Sun having risen further since the last photo the red colouration and banding visible on the solar disk has now faded to orange. Also a few whisps of cloud close to the Sun lend a pretty effect to this photo. Compare this photo to the one above and note how much the Moon has moved in a a few minutes. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, 2x teleconverter.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Eclipse, 31st May, 05:36 BST

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The eclipse is now over but the Sun still looks quite spectacular... A last shot before going back home and catching up with lost sleep! (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, 2x teleconverter.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Eclipse, 31st May 2003

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As you may have gathered Pete and I viewed the eclipse from the same location. There now follow several shots that he took of the partial eclipse. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Nikon Coolpix 775.

Photo: Pete Cutler.

Eclipse, 31st May 2003

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Another view of the eclispe, the time is now about 05:10 BST. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Nikon Coolpix 775.

Photo: Pete Cutler.

Eclipse, 31st May 2003

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This one is similar to the last, camera panned out a bit. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Nikon Coolpix 775.

Photo: Pete Cutler.

Eclipse, 31st May 2003

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The event continues to unfold... (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Nikon Coolpix 775.

Photo: Pete Cutler.

Eclipse, 31st May 2003

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The time is now 05:15 BST, not long to go before the Sun is 'complete'. Note the bird that wanted to get a piece of the action! (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Nikon Coolpix 775.

Photo: Pete Cutler.

Eclipse, 31st May 2003

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A final shot of the Sun with just a small portion covered by the Moon, the time is now 05:18 BST. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Nikon Coolpix 775.

Photo: Pete Cutler.

Eclipse, 31st May 2003

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This photo features in the August 2003 edition of Astronomy Now magazine. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)
*** Note: The full size image is 137kb. ***

Camera: Olympus C370uz.

Photo: Russell Hawker.


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TRANSIT OF MERCURY, 7TH MAY 2003

Transit of Mercury, 7th May 2003

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This unusual event, the first visible from the UK since 1973, was viewed by several members of Solent from our observatory at Toothill.

The primary set-up used to view the transit of Mercury was the 12 inch Newtonian reflector at the observatory. A filter made from Baader Safety Film was employed as a Solar filter and the images transmitted to a TV/Video via a Astrovid-StellaCam black and white CCD camera. This method ensured everyone could enjoy viewing the transit in safety - and everyone could watch and discuss the event at the same time. Not only that, I was able to record the transit on video tape!

This image taken by Pete Cutler shows the planet Mercury against the backdrop of the Sun. It really does bring home how tiny Mercury is compared to the Sun. Mark you, if the positions of Earth and Mercury were reversed, Earth would not appear much larger. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Mercury appears as a black dot close to the limb of the Sun. Also visible further away from the solar limb is a small sunspot - although 'small' is a relative term!

Camera: Nikon Coolpix 775. (Used via the 12 inch reflector.)

Photo: Pete Cutler.

Transit of Mercury, 7th May 2003

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This splendid full solar disc photo shows several points of interest... Mercury is the small dot at about the half past twelve position near the top of this image. Look at the large sunspot near the centre of the solar disc though - some crude calculations made this single sunspot to be some 15 000 to 20 000 km across! Visible near the solar limb at the eight O'clock position are two large sunspot groups, each about 50 000 km across. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Nikon Coolpix 775. (Viewed via another member's refractor.)

Photo: Pete Cutler.

Transit of Mercury, 7th May 2003

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Another shot of Mercury transiting the Sun on 7th May 2003. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Olympus C730uz. (Taken via Skywatcher 120mm f5 refractor, 25mm Plossl eyepiece. Single image processed in Adobe Photoshop.)

Photo: Russell Hawker.


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THE MOON

Full Moon, 16th April 2003

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This photo shows the Full Moon on the evening of 16th April 2003 shortly after rising, as seen from home. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, 2x teleconverter.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Crescent Moon, 4th April 2003

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The crescent Moon as seen from Toothill Observatory, 4th April 2003. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, via the 12 inch reflecting telescope at Toothill Observatory.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Crescent Moon, 5th April 2003

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The crescent Moon taken one day later than the photo above, again from Toothill observatory. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, via the 12 inch reflecting telescope at Toothill observatory.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Crescent Moon, 2nd August 2003

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Another crescent Moon photo taken from Toothill observatory, this time on 2nd August 2003. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, via the 12 inch reflecting telescope at Toothill observatory.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Moon, 6th September 2003

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Another Moon photo taken from Toothill observatory, 6th September 2003. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, via the 12 inch reflecting telescope at Toothill observatory.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Moon, 9th August 2003

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Yet another Moon photo taken from Toothill observatory, 9th August 2003. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: SONY Mavica MVC-FD73, via the 12 inch reflecting telescope at Toothill observatory.

Photo: Derek Haselden

Full Moon, sometime in 1996

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This is one of my favourite photo's of the Moon, taken sometime in the summer of 1996 (at about 4am) as I recall. The marked orange colouration is due to the Moon's low altitude at the time. (Click on the photo to see a larger version, use the 'Back' button of your browser to return to this part of the page.)

Camera: Pentax P30 via a 4 inch reflecting telescope, eyepiece projection.

Photo: Derek Haselden. (Thanks to Pete Cutler for scanning in the original print.)


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The photographs within this page are the property of the respective photographers. Reproduction or use of any of the photographs on this page without the prior permisssion of the Webmaster is forbidden.

Feedback about this site and suggestions for additional information and pages are welcome, please send an e-mail to The Webmaster.

© Derek Haselden & Solent Amateur Astronomers 2004